Browsing: NSA

National Security This January 31, 2012 US Navy handout image shows Vice Adm. Michael S. Rogers, commander of US Fleet Cyber Command and U.S.10th Fleet, speaking to students and staff at the Center for Information Dominance, Unit Monterey, California, during an all-hands call. US President Barack Obama is expected to name a US Navy admiral as the next head of the embattled National Security Agency, the Washington Post reported on January 27, 2014. If confirmed by lawmakers, Vice Admiral Michael Rogers, 53, would take over at a difficult moment for the spy agency, which is under unprecedented scrutiny after leaks from ex-intelligence contractor Edward Snowden revealed the extent of NSA eavesdropping. AFP PHOTO / HO / MC1 Nathan L. Guimont            == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / US NAVY / MC1 Nathan L. Guimont / NO SALES / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ==MC1 Nate Guimont/AFP/Getty Images ** OUTS - ELSENT, FPG, TCN - OUTS * NM, PH, VA if sourced by CT, LA or MoD **
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Obama decided last month not to split the leadership of the NSA and Cyber Command, as some senior intelligence officials had advocated. He also decided not to end the NSA tradition of naming a uniformed officer, rather than a civilian, as director.

Navy cryptologist Michael S. Rogers is President Obama’s top choice to take over the embattled National Security Agency — which conducts electronic surveillance operations worldwide — and the Pentagon’s cyber warfare command, officials say.

Rogers’ experience includes 30 years in the Navy, where he rose to vice admiral and managed the intelligence portfolio for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Currently, he runs the Navy’s cyber warfare arm.

NSA angry-birds-space
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The data pouring onto communication networks from the new generation of iPhone and Android apps ranges from phone model and screen size to personal details such as age, gender and location. Some apps, the documents state, can share users’ most sensitive information such as sexual orientation – and one app recorded in the material even sends specific sexual preferences such as whether or not the user may be a swinger.

Many smartphone owners will be unaware of the full extent this information is being shared across the internet, and even the most sophisticated would be unlikely to realise that all of it is available for the spy agencies to collect.

Scooping up information the apps are sending about their users allows the agencies to collect large quantities of mobile phone data from their existing mass surveillance tools – such as cable taps, or from international mobile networks – rather than solely from hacking into individual mobile handsets.

National Security NSA-Snowden
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In a lengthy interview broadcast on the public broadcaster ARD TV on Sunday, Snowden said the NSA did not limit its espionage to issues of national security and cited the German engineering firm Siemens as one target.

“If there’s information at Siemens that’s beneficial to US national interests – even if it doesn’t have anything to do with national security – then they’ll take that information nevertheless,” Snowden said in the interview conducted in Russia, where Snowden has claimed asylum.

Snowden also told the German public broadcasting network he no longer had possession of any documents or information on NSA activities and had turned everything over to select journalists. He said he did not have any control over the publication of the information.